If Mom Bloggers Lean-in Any More They’ll Just Walk All Over Us.  Thanks a lot, WSJ.

If Mom Bloggers Lean-in Any More They’ll Just Walk All Over Us. Thanks a lot, WSJ.

 

Having just returned from my all inclusive vacation Type-A Advanced Conference in Philadelphia, I am finding myself just a little bit pissed off by the Wall Street Journal’s piece (no link…not sending you there to give them traffic) about entrepreneurs, who just happen to be moms, escaping their mom-lives by attending conferences.

They might as well have said this:

And this:


Because obviously I’m not a real professional.  I’m just playacting at being a legitimate professional.  I mean, I’m a mom, so that whole working from home thing is really just a hobby to keep my little brain busy.

And I’m really upset that they twisted up Katherine Stone’s words, who is an amazing and inspirational and PROFESSIONAL blogger, who just happens to be a mom in addition to being an entrepreneur.

Now, let’s be honest.  Do I have fun when a I go to a blogging conference?  Uh, yes.  But I had fun when I went to conferences and professional development opportunities when I guess, according to this article, I had a “real job”.

And don’t get me started on the endless business trips Homeskillet’s taken over the years (read: one of them involved the words casino and all you can eat buffet).  Would anybody say the same thing about his trips?  I didn’t think so.

So, Kathrine, don’t apologize for your words being slapped all over that train-wreck of a piece.  We know who you are and we definitely know who we are. We are professional.  Oh, and go check out Katherine Stone’s Blog, Postpartum Progress…she wrote a post,  Overwhelmed by Motherhood: The Anatomy of an Anxiety Attack, that shook me to my core

Oh, and to the Wall Street Journal?  Thanks for portraying my profession as a bunch of opportunistic, burnt-out-moms who have to dress a vacation in business casual to get out of doing the laundry.

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  1. Yes and yes. Amen, my friend. This from one of the not-entirely-business oriented and still annoyed

  2. Katherine Stone is one of my heroes. Her website is an amazing resource and I really respect a woman who so flawlessly combines science and social outreach. Can’t wait to see which of her pieces really spoke to you, there are several that I have bookmarked to re-read once in awhile.

    And that WSJ article really missed the boat! What a wasted chance to highlight how non-traditional income sources and networking opportunities are becoming more prominent in today’s workforce. Or how the traditional workforce is losing out by not changing their environment to keep such energetic, skilled employees. Or how multi-talented women are balancing professional and self-growth with family growth. Or how online social media can build in-person socialization. I could go on…

    • Right?!?! I know that we have a huge culture shift going on when it comes to defining work and family spheres. Missed the boat? They didn’t even know why they were at the dock.

      As for the piece by Katherine, it was Overwhelmed by Motherhood: The Anatomy of an Anxiety Attack. I’m linking it into this post right now. I have felt this so many times myself. Reading it reminds me that I’m not alone.

  3. *fistbump* sister! I couldn’t agree more.

Trackbacks

  1. [...] The answer is that the Journal has published the umpteenth article dismissing women who blog — even as we are using our expertise across social media not just to develop our own brands and businesses, but to symbiotically develop some of the hottest new companies in the start-up economy (Pinterest, anyone?). MilitaryMoneyChica nails it in her post, “If Mom Bloggers Lean In Any More, They’ll Just Walk All Over US. Thanks a Lot WSJ“: [...]

  2. [...] The answer is that the Journal has published the umpteenth article dismissing women who blog — even as we are using our expertise across social media not just to develop our own brands and businesses, but to symbiotically develop some of the hottest new companies in the startup economy (Pinterest, anyone?). MilitaryMoneyChica nails it in her post, “If Mom Bloggers Lean In Any More, They’ll Just Walk All Over US. Thanks a Lot WSJ“: [...]

  3. [...] The answer is that the Journal has published the umpteenth article dismissing women who blog — even as we are using our expertise across social media not just to develop our own brands and businesses, but to symbiotically develop some of the hottest new companies in the startup economy (Pinterest, anyone?). MilitaryMoneyChica nails it in her post, “If Mom Bloggers Lean In Any More, They’ll Just Walk All Over Us. Thanks a Lot WSJ.”: [...]

  4. [...] The answer is that the Journal has published the umpteenth article dismissing women who blog — even as we are using our expertise across social media not just to develop our own brands and businesses, but to symbiotically develop some of the hottest new companies in the startup economy (Pinterest, anyone?). MilitaryMoneyChica nails it in her post, “If Mom Bloggers Lean In Any More, They’ll Just Walk All Over Us. Thanks a Lot WSJ.”: [...]

  5. [...] The answer is that the Journal has published the umpteenth article dismissing women who blog — even as we are using our expertise across social media not just to develop our own brands and businesses, but to symbiotically develop some of the hottest new companies in the startup economy (Pinterest, anyone?). MilitaryMoneyChica nails it in her post, “If Mom Bloggers Lean In Any More, They’ll Just Walk All Over Us. Thanks a Lot WSJ.”: [...]

  6. [...] The answer is that the Journal has published the umpteenth article dismissing women who blog — even as we are using our expertise across social media not just to develop our own brands and businesses, but to symbiotically develop some of the hottest new companies in the startup economy (Pinterest, anyone?). MilitaryMoneyChica nails it in her post, “If Mom Bloggers Lean In Any More, They’ll Just Walk All Over Us. Thanks a Lot WSJ.”: [...]

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